England, Ireland, and the Insular World: Textual and Material Connections in the Early Middle Ages

Essays in Anglo-Saxon Studies, Vol. 7

England, Ireland, and the Insular World: Textual and Material Connections in the Early Middle Ages

Edited by Mary Clayton, Alice Jorgensen, Juliet Mullins
2017 | 978-0-86698-564-2 | Hardcover 6 x 9 in
MRTS 509 | $70 |

ISAS Dublin 2013. England, Ireland and the Insular World: Textual and Material Connections in the Early Middle Ages is a collection of twelve essays related to the theme of the 2013 conference of the International Society of Anglo-Saxonists, ‘Insular Cultures’. Contributors cover a broad range of topics, from early medieval agriculture in Ireland and England, to sculpture, manuscript illumination and script, homilies, hagiography, aristocratic gift-giving, relics, calendars, Beowulf, and Anglo-Saxon perceptions of the Celtic peoples, considering connections, parallels and differences between Anglo-Saxon England and its insular neighbors. The volume will be of interest to all those working on Early Medieval history, literature, archaeology, liturgy, art, and manuscripts.

Edited by Mary Clayton, Alice Jorgensen, and Juliet Mullins


Contributors to the Volume:

Introduction:
Juliet Mullins, University College, Dublin

Ireland and Anglo-Saxon England: A Sideways Glance
Michael Ryan, University College, Dublin

Insular Agricultures: Comparisons, Contrasts, Connections
Debby Banham, University of Cambridge

East Meets West in Anglo-Saxon Sculpture
Jane Hawkes, University of York

Material Networks: Belt Relics in Early Ireland and Anglo-Saxon England
Karen Eileen Overbey, Tufts University

In a Strange Land: Anglo-Saxon Expats and Itinerant Objects in Ireland
Carol Neuman de Vegvar, Ohio Wesleyan University

Daniel and the Angel’s Embrace: An Insular Innovation?
Phyllis Portnoy, University of Manitoba

Irish Pilgrims, Welsh Manuscripts, and Anglo-Saxon Monasteries: Was Script Change in Tenth-Century England a Legacy of the Celtic World?
Christine Voth, University of Göttingen

Models of Vengeance in Anglo-Saxon and Irish Hagiography
Jennifer S. Key, Independent Scholar

An Irish Scholar and England: The “Metrical Calendar of Hampson”
Robert Gallagher, University of Oxford

Beowulf 1605b–1611, Psalm 147, and the Hour of Non
Helen Conrad-O’Briain, Trinity College, Dublin

A Voice of the Irish in Anglo-Saxon England: Deacon Niall and Embodied Validation in the Old English Sunday Letter Homilies
Jonathan Wilcox, University of Iowa

Anglo-Saxon Perceptions of the Celtic Peoples
Inge Milfull and Katrin Thier, Oxford English Dictionary