Anglo-Saxon Traces

ISAS Essays in Anglo-Saxon Studies, Vol. 4

Anglo-Saxon Traces

Edited by Jane Roberts and Leslie Webster
2011 | 352 + xvi pp. | 27 + 8 color ills. | 978-0-86698-453-9 | Hardcover 6 x 9 in
MRTS 405 | $78 | £58 |

Found on the banks of the River Ivel, near Biggleswade, Bedfordshire, in 2001, and acquired by the British Museum in 2006, the unique gold mancus of Coenwulf of Mercia (796–821), minted at London, was adopted as an apt logo for the Anglo-Saxon Traces conference. The seventeen papers brought together in this collection under the same title share a strong evidential focus. Remembering and celebrating England’s Anglo-Saxon past, the contributors reflect on the sense of place, on buildings and their uses, and on the changing landscape. Archaeological evidence is deployed to illuminate aspects of settlement, trade, and health and disability. Historical evidence is brought to bear on issues of wealth, status, and religion, on the ownership of treasure, precious artefacts, manuscripts and the scripts in which they were written, on the written records, and on the less tangible remains that help shape and interpret the past.