Anglo-Saxon England and the Continent

ISAS Essays in Anglo-Saxon Studies, Vol. 3

Anglo-Saxon England and the Continent

Edited by Hans Sauer and Joanna Story
2011 | 364 + xx pp. | 15 ills. | 978-0-86698-442-3 | Hardcover 6 x 9 in
MRTS 394 | $75 | £54 |

This volume explores some aspects of the relations between Anglo-Saxon England (449 to 1066) and the Continent. They worked both ways. Continental scholars and texts came to England: among the former were Abbo of Fleury and some of King Alfred’s learned helpers; among the latter were the Beowulf story, Genesis B, and a number of medical texts. On the other hand many Englishmen and Englishwomen as well as manuscripts came to the Continent: among the scholars and missionaries were Alcuin, Boniface, and Willibald, and nuns such as Hugeburc and Leoba; among the princesses was Eadgyth, or Edith, the wife of the German king and later emperor Otto I; among the manuscripts was the Codex Amiatinus, the oldest manuscript containing the complete Latin Vulgate Bible. Travels to Italy, especially Rome, were commonplace, and pilgrimages to Jerusalem were also undertaken.