From the Mediterranean to the Middle Passage: Slavery in the Old and New Worlds

A Public Symposium on the History of Slavery

Monday, February 29, 2016 from 2:00-5:00PM
UCB Building, Room 265/266
ASU West Campus
Free and open to the public

Eventbrite - From the Mediterranean to the Middle Passage: Slavery in the Old and New Worlds

This interactive panel session will study the political forces and cynical joining of events that forged the global medieval and Early Modern period: the Age of Empire and its economic bulwark, human slavery. The tragedy of the forced displacement and bondage of millions of human beings during the Middle Ages and Early Modern period, from the Mediterranean to West Africa and the Americas, involved high government administrators and mercantile interests of all continents and factions. We will explore the personal and cultural side of this phenomenon and its effects on racial/religious/gender relations during the period 1000-1800. The session will introduce new case studies regarding the impact of individual and cultural survival, and resistance strategies in Europe and the nascent colonial world. Slavery will be viewed in its many contradictory facets: color, religion, gender and class. The historical issue of slavery will be discussed in terms of the urgency of its impact on contemporary conceptions of human rights.

"A Forensic Analysis of Xica Da Silva and Slavery in Brazil"
Presented by Anthony Falsetti, Board Certified Forensic Anthropologist and Professor of Practice, School of Mathematical and Natural Sciences, ASU

"Resilience and Resistance: Marginalized Fashionistas of Early Venetian Convents"
Presented by Marsha Fazio, Lecturer, Renaissance Studies, School of Humanities, Arts and Cultural Studies, ASU

"Spanish and English Imperial Policies of Slavery in the Early Modern Period"
Presented by Sharonah Fredrick, Assistant Director, ACMRS

"Linguistic Strategies of Resistance in the West Indies"
Presented by Patricia Friedrich, Associate Director and Professor of Composition/Linguistics, School of Humanities, Arts and Cultural Studies, ASU