Horses, Boars, and Migrating Tribes: Artistic Content and Identity Politics in Early Medieval England

"Horses, Boars, and Migrating Tribes: Artistic Content and Identity Politics in Early Medieval England"

Presented by Christopher Roberts, PhD.
School of Human Evolution and Social Change, ASU

Eventbrite - Ad Hoc Lecture: "Horses, Boars, and Migrating Tribes"

FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

The Anglo-Saxon peoples (i.e., the people living in England between the fall of Rome and the Norman Conquest) are often credited with founding the contemporary English nation. Although central to contemporary definitions of English identity, the evidence of how these peoples identified themselves in the first millennium AD is much less straightforward. In this talk I will explore how the people who arrived on Britain's shores in the fifth century AD could have perceived themselves with respect to their neighbors, and how they likely incorporated themselves into different communities across the broader North Sea Region. Using evidence from archaeology, linguistics, and literary narratives I will argue that the people of medieval Britain employed different styles of identity from those we do today, and that as a result we need to be more careful when we discuss the ancestral relationships they share with English-speaking peoples of the world today.

Questions? Comments? Send an email to acmrs@acmrs.org and we’ll get right back to you!

Part of the ACMRS Ad Hoc Lecture Series

Lattie F. Coor Hall, Room 4403, ASU Tempe Campus